Sleep and the Social Matrix: Determinants of Health Status Beyond Objective Social Status


Stacy A. Ogbeide, Christopher A. Neumann

Abstract


Aim: The purpose of this study was to examine the relationship between subjective social status (SSS) and objective socioeconomic status (SES) on sleep status (sleep duration and daytime sleepiness).
Method: The study sample included 73 primary care patients from a free medical clinic in which low-income individuals are primarily treated. Subjective social status was measured using the MacArthur Scale of Subjective Social Status which uses a pictorial format (social ladder) in order to assess current social status. Socioeconomic status was measured by assessing highest level of education and current income level.
Results: Community SSS did not significantly predict sleep duration or daytime sleepiness. Additional regression analyses were conducted and it was found that an overall model of U.S. SSS and community SSS significantly predicted perceived stress. Community SSS was found to be significantly associated with perceived stress. Regression results also indicated that an overall model of U.S. SSS and community SSS significantly predicted perceived health status.
Conclusion: It may be beneficial for clinicians working with low-income primary care populations to include measures of SSS in addition to the traditional measures of SES for multidimensional patient care.

Keywords


socioeconomic status; social status; sleep